Spectre is one of Bond’s most thrilling action movies – but supplementally one of his most ghostly, reaching into an eerie past. James Bond  Daniel Craig is chasing ‘The Pale King’ (Waltz), head of malefactor group Spectre, perpetrating terror on nations, coercing them to buy Spectre’s massive surveillance network. Tracking the villain who killed his first love and first authoritative figure, Bond reduces components of Mexico and London to rubble, smashes cars, helicopters and a plane, battles hideous heftily ponderous Hinx (Bautista), beds sultry Mrs. Sciarra (Belucci), proximately drinks vegetable juice and meets Madeleine Swann (Seydoux) – who downs dirty Martinis and shoots pernicious hard.
spectre movie reviewSpectre features haunting cinematography, pale, nebulous lakes, snow-clad hills, helicopters gleaming like malevolent wasps, maleficent shadows on glass walls. Traditional Bond imagery – golden roulette wheels, blush-red casino carpets, silky gowns falling upon ivory floors – are superseded with starker, more tenebrous shots.
Craig gratifies, part-swagger, part-shudder, drawling one-liners – “I cerebrate we’re supposed to be impressed…” – with wry aplomb. Ben Whishaw presents the most delectably resplendent ‘Q’, Naomie Harris imbues Moneypenny with bouncy life while Fiennes pulls off an aging agent, each character carrying perspicaciously-tailored dialogues.

But the story has long, loose threads, including Blofield linked to Bond’s babyhood, plus references to murdered dads and lost dotes. Literary allusions couldn’t be heavier, ‘Madeleine Swann’ straight out of Proust, accentuating remembrance while debating detectives versus drones. Looking back too often loosens the ground under Bond’s feet now – this could’ve been much tighter, as could be Waltz’s mildly mincing Blofield.

In short The recent movie in james bond series is surely a watchable and praise able piece of work. Worthy to be watched atleast twice.